Why FoodWrite Ltd ?

Featured

Welcome From FoodWrite !

FoodWrite Ltd. loves helping businesses achieve their market potential, make the best business decisions and improve their profits !

FoodWrite Ltd. provides consultancy on technologies and markets for the food and beverages industry, and in related industries such as personal care, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, resources, biochemical engineering and nutritional healthcare.  Food and nutrition ingredients, dietary and health supplements, and animal products are all core areas of expertise.

♦ FoodWrite Ltd writes web-content and has increased web-site rankings simply by providing high quality written material to support sales and marketing. It also offers SEO, website development in WordPress, PHP and Magento.

♦ FoodWrite Ltd brings together all the skills needed for creativity, entrepreneurship, innovation and quality of advice in helping businesses develop their strategies for growth.

It covers:-

– technical and business writing, and both scientific and commercial bid  proposals,

– patent writing, applications, support and appeal documents and interpretation,

– product marketing,

– consumer consultancy,

– costings and cost effectiveness on projects

– product concepts and development

– provides high quality technology analysis, updates, action plans and reports based on data and scientific literature.  

♦ It also offers technology scouting, identifying partners for collaboration, business and market development, and a B2B strategy for emerging technologies in food science and processing.

♦ It  provides product documentation and specification services coupled with technical market research to the food industry. White papers and marketing materials to support web-sites are a speciality and a number of clients use this service including the copyright more than any.

FoodWrite Ltd. helps a range of companies, from multinational manufacturers and suppliers, venture capital firms to research organisations and to smaller companies.  The consultancy draws upon great technical skills and knowledge coupled with management insight to provide a comprehensive service.

♦ We help customers realise their potential by providing support, expertise, support and advice to encourage best practice and continuous improvement. 

FoodWrite Ltd. started in 2011. Communication with the client is the heart of the service, ensuring we work closely to deliver all your milestones on time. You may be starting a food business or trying to understand the market place for a technology, please be confident that your project is managed professionally. Project proposals are generated ensuring all steps, their costs and timings are clear and transparent. The advice is high quality and tailored to your needs with progress updates provided as required. The knowledge has helped clients develop their intellectual property (IP), or otherwise supported their investment decisions in new markets or technology. 

♦ Checkout the case studies on this web-site.

♦ Give us a call or e-mail and use FoodWrite Ltd‘s experiences to open up new markets, meet the challenges you face and add value to your business.  Telephone consultancy is also available.  Our passion is to provide answers that can be actionable and to work closely with you

Lets transform your business at an affordable cost. If you are interested in other topics to be written about- just let me know !

Contact: 4, Bowens Hill, Coleford. Glocs. GL16 8DH  T: 01594 810704 M: 07714101039

Clients we work with include the European Commission, General Mills, GlaxoSmithKline, Lucozade Ribena Suntory (LRS), Riskaware, ThermoFisher Scientific, Sumitomo and Unilever.

 

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2015/03/05/what-is-foodwrite/
Twitter
LinkedIn

Vervain

Vervain (latin name: Verbena officinalis) is a valuable herbal. Early Christian folklore has it that vervain was used to staunch Jesus’ wounds once he was removed from his crucifix hence its other popular name of herb-of-the-cross. These days vervain is prescribed by modern herbalists as a herbal aspirin, a gentle pain reliever.

Availability

Purchase from our affiliate Pestle Herbs either 50g or 100g amounts.

Uses

  • Some studies show vervain has similar effects to aspirin such as reducing inflamation and mild pain relief
  • Traditionally used for headaches, fever and as a tranquilizer

Preparation

To enjoy as an infusion for relief from a headache or mild arthritic or other pain add two teaspoons of dried herb to a cup of boiling water, steep for ten minutes and drink up to three times per day.  Add sugar or honey to sweeten the bitter taste.

To have as a tincture take half to one teaspoon up to three times per day.

Cautionary Information

  • Vervain may depress the heart rate so avoid if you have any history of heart disease or heart condition of any sort
  • Vervain may restrict the bronchial passages so avoid if you suffer from asthmatic condition
  • Do not give to any child under two years old
  • Do not use while pregnant or nursing
  • For over 65s, use low levels, infrequently

 

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/04/21/vervain/
Twitter
LinkedIn

Hops

Hops (Latin name: Humulus Iupulus) were used in herbal medicine long before their use in fermented barley drinks that we know as beer. The Germans added hops to beer in about the 9th Century AD and by the 14th Century, when brewers had learned of hop’s preservative powers, most of Europe was doing it, replacing other herbs such as Marjoram and Yarrow and flavour enhancers. Some, including Henry VIII, felt the herb was dangerous to add to beer so he made it illegal and it wasn’t until 1552 that it was welcomed back.

Dried hop flowers.

Available from Pestle Herbs in 50g and 100g as organically grown dried flower heads. (Click on the amount to be taken to the affiliate marketing site to purchase these seeds).

Uses

  • When hop production increased for beer brewing, harvesters noticed that they tired easily and the women’s periods came on early, which gave hops a reputation as a sedative and as an aid to menstruation
  • Hops contain a sedative chemical called 2-methly-3-buten-2-ol, which is more concentrated in dried, older hops
  • Hops may be used to relax the digestive tract

Preparation

To enjoy as an infusion, steep two teaspoons of hops in hot water for up to five minutes. To help get to sleep use older dried hops but for digestive use, its believed that fresh hops are more effective.

Cautionary Information

  • Do not give to any child under two years old
  • Do not use while pregnant or nursing
  • For over 65s, use low levels, infrequently
Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/04/20/hops/
Twitter
LinkedIn

Fennel

Fennel seeds.

Fennel (Latin name: Foeniculum vulgare var.dulce) was known by the ancient Greeks as ‘marathon’ and the famous ancient village from whence the long-distance runner run was named after the herb, which used to grow there in abundance. The word ‘marathon’ itself however derives from the Greek word ‘maraino’ which means ‘to grow thin’ and this was understood to be one of the wide-ranging digestive effects of consuming fennel.

Available from Pestle Herbs in 50g and 100g as organically grown dried seeds. (Click on the amount to be taken to the affiliate marketing site to purchase these seeds).

Uses

  • Fennel is used as a digestive aid, to relieve gas and bloating and the symptoms of IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) as well as abdominal cramps, water retention, heartburn and to boost sexual libido.
  • Fennel is a mild appetite suppressant, especially when taken just before eating when it will also help with digestion and avoid indigestion
  • Some studies suggest Fennel has estrogenic properties and is used to relieve the symptoms of menopause or to help bring on menstruation

Preparation

Fennel is an easy and fantastic addition to many dishes but to derive the greatest benefit as a digestive aid, simply chew on a teaspoon of seeds. Alternatively,  drink as an infusion, add two teaspoons of bashed and mashed seeds to a cup of boiling water and steep for ten minutes and enjoy up to three times a day.

Cautionary Information

  • Do not give to any child under two years old
  • Do not use while pregnant or nursing
Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/04/20/fennel/
Twitter
LinkedIn

Vitex agnus-castus – A Herbal Treatment For Premenstrual Tension

Vitex agnus-castus flower in the garden. Copyright: miragik / 123RF Stock Photo

The Vitex agnus-castus tree, commonly shortened to ‘vitex’, monk’s pepper or the chaste tree as it is often known is a deciduous shrub.  It’s native to the Mediterranean and Central Asia. The shrub has long, finger-shaped leaves, blue-violet flowers, and dark purple berries.

As far back as Roman times, the fruit and seeds were used to make herbal medicines mainly to treat premenstrual tension and reduce sexual issues.

Premenstrual Tension

Vitex agnus-castus is taken by mouth for treating various menstrual conditions and alleviating pain, menstrual cycle irregularities, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), a more severe form of PMS called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), and symptoms of menopause. It is also used for treating “lumpy” (fibrocystic) breasts, female infertility, preventing miscarriage in women with low levels of a hormone called progesterone, controlling bleeding and helping the body force out the placenta after childbirth, and increasing breast milk. It has also been used for treating anxiety during menstrual cycles.

Diuretic

Vitex agnus-castus is also taken by mouth to increase the flow of urine in men, for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It does not reduce sexual desire as was commonly thought but does alter hormone levels as evident in the female reproductive system. Historians claim that monks chewed chaste tree parts to make it easier to maintain their celibacy hence the common name. The latin specific name ‘castus’ actually means chaste.

Other Conditions

A few people take vitex agnus-castus by mouth for acne, nervousness, dementia, joint conditions, colds, upset stomach, spleen disorders, headaches, migraine, eye pain, body inflammation, fractures and swelling.

Some people apply vitex agnus-castus to the skin to flush out parasites and to prevent insect bites and stings.

Application

Taken as a tincture or infusion, or in tablet and capsule form.

Cautionary Information

  • Vitex agnus-castus supplementation should be avoided during pregnancy due to the possibility of complications.
  • Do not give to any child under two years old.
  • Do not use while nursing.
  • For over 65s, use low levels, infrequently.

Toxicity

The toxicity of the herbal extract has been examined extremely thoroughly (Daniele et al., 2005). The pharmacology and research up to 2003 on the plant has also been assessed (Wuttke et al., 2003).

Purchase & Availability

Our affiliate marketing partner Pestle Herbs offers the herbal supplement in both 50g and 100g quantities as dried seeds. (Click on the amount to be taken to the site). Their offering is also organic.

 

References

Daniele, C., Coon, J. T., Pittler, M. H., & Ernst, E. (2005). Vitex agnus castus. Drug Safety, 28(4), pp. 319-332.

Wuttke, W., Jarry, H., Christoffel, V., Spengler, B., & Seidlova-Wuttke, D. (2003). Chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus)–pharmacology and clinical indications. Phytomedicine, 10(4), pp. 348-357
Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/04/20/10168/
Twitter
LinkedIn

Valerian, A Herbal Supplement For Influencing Mood

The plant Valerian (Valeriana officinalis L.) which is found throughout Europe and some Western parts of Asia could offer the insomniac some relief and relaxation by acting as a potent sleeping aid and reducing depression or anxiety. The evidence is developing. Over many years of study, Valerian has been suggested to combat all these issues.

Photo by Stuart Miles. Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Valerian is claimed to help reduce anxiety. Photo by Stuart Miles. Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

History

Valerian’s name comes from the Latin ‘valere’ meaning strong and although the plant has a powerful and unpleasant odour, its reputation more likely came from its properties as a relaxant and sleep aid. In modern Europe, valerian root is used in a multitude of herbal sleep and tranquilizer remedies, but this use probably goes all the way back to 13th Cent. Germany, when legend has it that a certain Pied Piper used Valerian to ‘hypnotise’ the village of Hamelin’s rat population and lead them out of town.

Availability

The organic, dried root powder is available from Pestle Herbs in 50g and 100g quantities. (Click on the amounts to be taken to the affiliate marketing site).

 

 

 

Current Uses

  • Valerian root is the most popular and widely-used herbal sedative and sleep-inducer.
  • Valerian may help lower blood pressure but always consult a medical professional before trying a herbal remedy for issues relating to blood pressure.

Preparation

Try two teaspoons of powdered root in a cup of hot water just before going to bed for relief from insomnia or just to relax. You might want to add lemon, honey or sugar to make the taste sweeter.

Alternatively drink as a tincture, one teaspoon just before bedtime.

Cautionary Information

  • Consult a medical professional if you are already taking any sedatives or tranquilizers before taking valerian
  • Do not give to any child under two years old
  • Do not use while pregnant or nursing
  • For over 65s, use low levels, infrequently

Research Evidence

The Clinical Studies

A double blind study reported in 2002 that compared valerian extracts with diazepam treatment in 36 patients suffering Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD). It found that neither treatment beyond that of the placebo had any effect on anxiety reduction (Andreatini et al., 2002). In combination with a St. John’s Wort extract however, it was observed to reduce depressive symptoms and anxiety over a 6 week period (Muller et al., 2003). When 10 healthy young volunteers were given doses of 600, 1,200 or 1,800mg of a valerian extract compared to a control of 10mg diazepam and a placebo, there was no effect on mood changes either(Gutierrez et al., 2004). Likewise, 16 patients suffering sleep issues were given between 300mg or 600mg of a valerian extract compared to a placebo and no significant difference was observed here either (Diaper and Hindmarch, 2004). The evidence at the moment is not compelling however many more studies are being conducted to get at the nub of the remedy.

Rat & Mouse Models

Focus on rat and mouse models has indicated that there was no sedative effects but more an antidepressant and anxiolytic effect (Hattesohi et al., 2008) from valerian extract that contributed to any sleep-enhancing benefit. The active component is valerenic acid which produces barbiturate-like effects on performance tests with mice. This active alters the neural activity associated with the brain’s GABA system and to some small extent, the serotonergic system. (Khom et al., 2007).

Awad et al. (2007) found that an ethanolic extract of valerian increased GABA levels in the rat brain and neurotransmission by stimulating glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The enzyme GABA transaminase which is responsible for breaking down GABA was also inhibited. The reduction in anxiety was further demonstrated in a mouse model using the elevated plus maze model (Murphy et al., 2010). It is thought that valerenic acid modulates adenosine receptors as it can antagonise the adenosine blocking effect of caffeine for example.

The reality is that Valerian has componentry which has properties which could influence mood but further, more comprehensive human clinical trials are required to allow us to draw more forthright conclusions.

References

Andreatini, R. Sartori, V.A. Seabra, M.L. Leite, J.R. (2002) Effect of valepotriates (valerian extract) in generalized anxiety disorder: a randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study. Phytother. Res. 16 pp. 650-4
Awad, R.,Levac,D.,Cybulska,P.,Merali,Z.,Trudeau,V.L.,Arnason,J.T. (2007) Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals of enzymes of the g-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system. Can. J. Phys. Pharmacol. 85 (9), pp. 933–942.
Benke, D., Barberis, A., Kopp, S., Altmann, K., Schubiger, M., Vogt, K., Rudolph, U.,Möhler, H. (2009) GABA(A) receptors as in vivo substrate for the anxiolytic action of valerenic acid, a major constituent of valerian root extracts. Neuropharmacology 56  pp.174–181.
Diaper, A. Hindmarch, I. (2004) A Double-blind placebo controlled investigation of the effects of two doses of a valerian preparation on the sleep, cognitive and psychomotor function of sleep-disturbed older adults. Phytother. Res. 18 pp. 831-836
Gutierrez, S. Ang-Lee, M.K. Walker, D.J. Zacny, J. P. (2004) Assessing subjective and psychomotor effects of the herbal medication valerian in healthy young volunteers. Pharm. Biochem. Behaviour 78 pp. 57-64

Hattesohl, M., Feistel, B., Sievers, H., Lehnfeld, R., Hegger, M., Winterhoff, H. (2008) Extracts of Valeriana officinalis L. s.l. show anxiolytic and antidepressant effects but neither sedative nor myorelaxant properties. Phytomedicine, 15 (1-2) pp. 2–15
Khom, S.,Baburin,I.,Timin,E.,Hohaus,A.,Trauner,G.,Kopp,B.,Hering,S.,2007. Valerenic acid potentiates and inhibits GABA-A receptors: molecular mechanism and subunit specificity. Neuropharmacology 53(1), pp. 178–187.
Muller, D. Pfeil, T. Von den Driesch, V. (2003) Treating depression comorbid with anxiety – results of an open, practised-oriented study with St John’s wort WS 5572 and valerian extract in high doses. Phytomedicine 10 (Suppl 4) pp. 25-30
Murphy, K., Kubin, Z.J., Shepherd, J.N., Ettinger, R.H. (2009) Valeriana officinalis root extracts have potent anxiolytic effects in laboratory rats. Phytomedicine 17 (8–9), pp. 674–678.

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/04/19/valerian-mood/
Twitter
LinkedIn

UK Food Labelling And Packaging: What It Means !

 

Food labelling and how that food is packaged are one of the most important aspects of law when offering products for sale and for consumption. It applies to small-scale caterers as well as those selling packaged products from a factory. Any food offered must obey Article 16 of The General Food Law Regulation (EC) 178/2002. This law clearly states that any foods presented for sale within a premises should not mislead consumers, and neither should the labelling, advertising and presentation of that food.

The UK Government web-site gives a full and explicit explanation of the labelling requirements.

How Should The Information be Presented

There is a certain amount of basic information required on the label and a list of all the ingredients. When we sell any food or beverage the label must obey the following:-

  • Clear and easy to read
  • Easy to understand
  • Visible
  • Not misleading
  • Permanent and not temporary or too easily removed.
  • Provide warnings where required

Labelling should clearly stipulate the product for sale which is known as the ‘legal definition’, as well as address any allergen information contained within the food on the packaging.

What Must be Shown On A Food Label

The following information must be shown on the front of a packaged food:-

  • The legal name of the food
  • A ‘best before’ or ‘use by’ date. Instructions must be provided on how to find it if it is not immediately visible.
  • All warnings
  • Amounts and quantity information.

Other information which must be shown can be shown on the front, side or back of the packaging.

  • A list of all ingredients even if there are more than two.
  • The name and address of the manufacturer, packer or seller.
  • The lot number or use-by-date if required.
  • Any special or specific storage conditions which keeps the food in good quality.
  • Instructions on how to use the food such as preparation, cooking etc.

Quantity Information & Amounts

The net quantity is always stated on the label and is quoted in grams, kilograms, millilitres or litres. The net quantity is always stated for packaged foods over 5g or 5ml and for packaged herbs and spices. It must be clear about how many items are available in a package and the quantity information must be very clearly expressed.

In retailing, it is quite common to see a bar code but this is not required by law.

 

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/04/19/uk-food-labelling-packaging-means/
Twitter
LinkedIn

The Critical Importance Of Magnesium in Nutrition And General Well-Being

♠ Magnesium helps regulate calcium transport and absorption

♣ It stimulates the secretion of the hormone calcitonin which helps the integration of calcium into bone and in bone mineral reabsorption.

♥ It promotes nerve and muscle function.

♦ A magnesium-rich diet might reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, stroke and general heart disease.

♠ May reduce the incidence of bone fractures in men.

Magnesium is the  second most abundant mineral in the body after calcium. It is an essential cation required in a range of physiological processes of the human body. Leroy (1926) and Kruse et al. (1933) first described the essentiality of magnesium to animals. Magnesium is the eighth most common element in the Earth’s crust. 

Top Ten Magnesium Foods

Top ten magnesium foods vector. Copyright: kninwong / 123RF Stock Photo

Functions:

  • – A cofactor in more than 300 enzymatic reactions including enzymes involved in energy  metabolism, especially glucose metabolism and nucleic acid or DNA synthesis.
  • – Essential for proper protein production.
  • – Required for effective absorption of calcium and ameliorates osteoporosis.
  • – Protective effect against a variety of diseases.

Magnesium deficiency leads to poor glucose tolerance and is a risk factor in cardiovascular disease especially those associated with diabetes (Ma et al., 1995).  The daily magnesium intake in the Western diet is sufficient  enough but increased dietary intake would reduce many disease risks associated with low serum concentrations of this mineral (Vormann, 2003).

Improving Brain Function

The mineral is also need for brain function and supplements have been prescribed for people suffering concussion. One palatable form is magnesium L-threonate whilst magnesium citrate is another possibility. A number of studies have demonstrated it helps with reversing memory loss, improving recognition and learning. Magnesium also helps to maintain the health of neuron cells and increase neural plasticity. The threonate anion apparently crosses the blood brain barrier more easily which implies it can enter brain synapses.

Role In Reducing Diabetes

Meta-analyses have long suggested that levels of magnesium intake are associated with a reduction in type-2 diabetes.  Unfortunately these earlier studies suffered from inconsistencies in sample size and reporting on magnesium consumption.

Researchers from the Zhejiang University and Zhengzhou University in China analysed data from over 1 million people from nine countries in 40 studies performed between 1999 and 2016 (Fang et al., 2016). They looked at the levels of dietary magnesium ingested from self-reported food frequency questionnaires and 24-hour dietary recalls. Given the variations in reporting intakes of magnesium and how the categories were defined, the researchers looked at the effect of a 100 mg per day increase in magnesium intake on general health and well-being.

The data suggested a magnesium-rich diet could  reduce type-2 diabetes by 26% in that group taking the highest magnesium doses. Even an extra 100 mg per day could reduce type-2 diabetes by about 19%.

Role In Reducing Heart Disease And Stroke

Meta-analyses have long suggested that levels of magnesium intake are associated with a reduction in heart disease and stroke.  Issues on reporting hampered interpretation as in the assessment on diabetes.

The same meta-analysis (Fang et al., 2016) reported for studies into type-2 diabetes showed similar reductions for level of stroke and heart disease generally. Those taking the highest magnesium doses per day, reduced their heart disease potential by 10% and risk of stroke by 12%. Likewise, an extra 100 mg per day could reduce stroke risk by about 7%.

The lead author, Dr. Fudi Wang (lead author and researcher from the school of Public Health at Zhejiang University) is reported as saying:-

Low levels of magnesium in the body are associated with a range of diseases but no conclusive evidence has been put forward on the link between dietary magnesium and health risks.”

“Our meta-analysis supports a link between magnesium in food and reducing the risk of disease.”

Symptoms Of Deficiency

The symptoms of clinically low serum magnesium or overt hypomagnesemia  include the following conditions. These are possible indicators of chronic latent magnesium deficiency.  

  • ADHD
  • Asthma
  • Cardiac arrhythmias
  • Chest pain (angina)
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Cluster headaches
  • Coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis
  • Depression
  • Epilepsy
  • Hypertension
  • Migraine
  • Osteoporosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Premenstrual syndrome
  • Sleep problems
  • Type II diabetes

Magnesium is available under branded names such as Magtein obtained from AIDP (see www.aidp.com or magtein.com) and Solgar who offer the citrate variant.

EFSA Requirements For Magnesium

In July 2015, EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) set adequate intakes (AIs) at 350 mg/day for men and 300 mg/day for women. The AI for children was set at a range from 170 to 300 mg per day and was age related.

Even though magnesium is essential, its deficiency is common even in developed countries. Between 15 and 20% of the population in these nations only take about 30% of the adequate intake level.

Dietary magnesium is absorbed mostly in the small intestine via passive paracellular transport, which is driven by an electrochemical gradient and solvent drag (Graham et al., 1960; Aliaga et al., 1990).

References

Aliaga, I.L., Miller, D.L., Wilson, H.D., Schedl, H.P. (1990) Effects of resection on absorption and secretion of divalent cations by small intestine of rat. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 52(5) pp. 867–71.

Fang, X., Wang, K., Han, D., et al. (2016) Dietary magnesium intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. BMC Med. 2016;14:210. DOI: 10.1186/s12916-016-0742-z

Graham, L.A., Caesar, J.J., Burgen, A.S. (1960) Gastrointestinal absorption and excretion of Mg 28 in man. Metabolism. 9 pp. 646–59.

Kruse, H.D., Orent, E.R. & McCollom, E.V. (1933). Studies on magnesium deficiency in animals. III. Chemical changes in the  blood following magnesium deprivation. J. Biol. Chem., 100, pp. 603–643

Leroy, J. (1926). Necessity of magnesium for growth of mice. Comptes Rendus des Séances et Mémoires de la Société de Biologie, 94, pp. 431.

Vormann, J. (2003). Magnesium: nutrition and metabolism. Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 24,   pp.  27–37.

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/04/08/magnesium-nutrition/
Twitter
LinkedIn

What Is Kombucha ?

Kombucha is a fermented tea drink and is stated quite categorically to have a flavour similar to cider and champagne. That flavour depends very much on the type of tea used and its taste is far removed from what a fermented tea would be expected to taste like. Why harp on about its flavour ? Probably because adherents to its nutritional properties have absolute belief in its restorative powers even though claims for its efficacy are not yet firmly cast.

The tea is thought to have originated in China and has been consumed for over 2000 years. The first records come from 221 BC where it was known as ‘The Tea of Immortality’. The history relating to its benefits come mainly from anecdotal evidence as is the case with many traditional products. It is also known as haipao, kocha kinoko, homgo, suancha or takezutsu-sancha. It is also believed to be a treatment for everything from arthritis to cancer, osteoporosis, treating high blood pressure, neurotoxicological complaints and so on (Dufresne and Farnworth, 2000). A large Russian study claimed in the early 50s claimed that daily consumption of kombucha was correlated with a high tolerance to cancer although this remains to be proven by other studies.

Microbiology

The beverage contains a variety of highly beneficial yeasts and bacteria and molds which is known as a SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast). The SCOBY can be viewed as a form of probiotic culture although this is a misnomer. The manufacture of kombucha relies on bathing black or in some cases, green tea with a culture of SCOBY which looks like a rubbery disc or “mushroom”. The cultures can be used over a number of times. The fermentation medium also includes water usually spring water, cane sugar, black tea and distilled white vinegar to reduce the pH. The bacteria is mostly Lactobacillus with Acetobacter and the changes they produce are now well understood (Teoh et al., 2004; Jayabalan et al., 2007).

The equipment used in the home consists of a highly sterilized glass jar for the fermentation and a coffee filter or weave cloth to filter out the bacteria. The tea is fermented in the jar in a warm place for up to about a month. The kombucha needs to be tasted at various stages to check flavour and sweetness. Some of the SCOBY is retained for use in the next batch.

The products produced by fermentation include a variety of food acids including acetic acid (vinegar), gluconic acid and is also slightly carbonated. Caffeine is retained in the brewing mix. The product lends itself well to development with a variety of types now available.

Market Research

The latest market research from Technavio shows the global kombucha market will grow by almost 15% (CAGR) from 2017 to 2021. Much of this growth is in the USA in trendy markets where it is projected to reach $1.8 billion globally by 2020. The current market is $1.2 billion worldwide. The market can be split into two product types, organic and non-organic. In 2016, the organic kombucha segment accounted for 95% of the market. The Chinese are the largest consumers of the drink in the East but this may be due to the development of the drink from this country.

Product Technology

SCOBY discs can be purchased from Happy Kombucha to produce about a litre of fermented tea and is certified to be organic.

References

Dufresne, C., & Farnworth, E. (2000). Tea, Kombucha, and health: a review. Food Research Int., 33(6), pp. 409-421

Jayabalan, R., Marimuthu, S., & Swaminathan, K. (2007). Changes in content of organic acids and tea polyphenols during kombucha tea fermentation. Food Chemistry, 102(1), pp. 392-398.

Teoh, A. L., Heard, G., & Cox, J. (2004). Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 95(2), pp. 119-126.

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/03/31/what-is-kombucha/
Twitter
LinkedIn

BCAAs

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/03/30/bcaas/
Twitter
LinkedIn

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)

Widespread interest in the potential health benefits of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) especially in conjunction with polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs). Animal studies have largely shown that CLAs in particular can reduce, almost inhibit certain types of cancer and influence weight reduction, general energy metabolism and even diabetes.

Conjugated linoleic acid is a mixture of both geometric and positional isomers of linoleic acid where the double bonds are conjugated. The natural source for these omega-6 fatty acids is through microbial isomerization of dietary linoleic acid (Chin et al., 1994).

There are some excellent reviews on the health benefits (Belury, 2002; Wahle et al., 2004; Bhatacharya et al., 2006; Dilzer and Park, 2012; Hennessy et al., 2016).

The supplement is generally used by sports people especially body builders and athletes.

Products

There are a number of supplements available. Forza supply just the conjugated linoleic acid as 1g amounts in 90g capsules.

 

 

 

 

Our Amazon affiliate offers the following varieties of CLA from the following suppliers:- Iron Ore Health, eBody Ltd., Elite Health, Zestlife and Iron Labs Nutrition. All of these are in capsule form.

 

References

Belury, M. A. (2002). Dietary conjugated linoleic acid in health: physiological effects and mechanisms of action 1. Ann. Rev. Nutrition, 22(1), pp. 505-531

Bhattacharya, A., Banu, J., Rahman, M., Causey, J., & Fernandes, G. (2006). Biological effects of conjugated linoleic acids in health and disease. J. Nutritional Biochemistry, 17(12), pp. 789-810.

Chin, S. F., Storkson, J. M., Albright, K. J., Cook, M. E., & Pariza, M. W. (1994). Conjugated linoleic acid is a growth factor for rats as shown by enhanced weight gain and improved feed efficiency. J. Nutrition, 124(12), pp. 2344-2349

Dilzer, A., & Park, Y. (2012). Implication of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in human health. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 52(6), pp. 488-513

Hennessy, A. A., Ross, P. R., Fitzgerald, G. F., & Stanton, C. (2016). Sources and bioactive properties of conjugated dietary fatty acids. Lipids, 51(4), pp. 377-397

Wahle, K. W., Heys, S. D., & Rotondo, D. (2004). Conjugated linoleic acids: are they beneficial or detrimental to health? Progress in Lipid Research, 43(6), pp. 553-587

 

Please follow and like us:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foodwrite.co.uk/2017/03/30/conjugated-linoleic-acid-cla/
Twitter
LinkedIn